Engineer career put to students

BEL project design engineer Graeme Stephenson with apprentices Faye Henry and Steven Reay and five Bede Academy students at the engineering day.
BEL project design engineer Graeme Stephenson with apprentices Faye Henry and Steven Reay and five Bede Academy students at the engineering day.
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MORE than 160 students at a Blyth school have been given an insight into the working life of an engineering apprentice.

An engineer from one of Tyneside’s largest companies took two apprentices along to the Bede Academy to fire up young people about a career in engineering.

Newcastle-based British Engines Ltd (BEL) took two of the companies apprenticeships to talk to the students aged 13 and 14.

Graeme Stephenson, project design engineer at BEL, said: “The engineering day is a great opportunity for young people to hear first hand about opportunities in the field.

“I completed my apprenticeship at BEL so can tell students exactly what it is like to train as an engineer after school.”

Students took part in activities, including putting together a BEL valve for the oil industry worth over £30,000, as well as attending presentations from other engineering companies, architects and the British Army.

Year 9 student Isla Jones said: “It was great to talk to people enthusiastic about their job.

“Meeting the apprentices showed me that there are so many different career options in engineering open to me.

“Taking part in the activities was a great way of understanding what we have learnt in the classroom.”

Mark Davies, director of engineering at the academy, said: “The day was a great success – we have received extremely positive feedback from the students.

“We are very grateful to BEL for taking the time to bring lessons to life in the classroom and help us show students the wealth of engineering careers available to them.”

“It was also fantastic to see apprentices, like Faye Henry from BEL who attended our sister school Emmanuel College, returning to speak to pupils as an apprentice.”

BEL employs around 900 people in a group of companies that includes Walker based BEL Valves that supplies high pressure valves to the oil and gas industry and Rotary Power, designers and manufacturers of hydraulic pumps and motors.

Based at Cramlington is CMP Products, that designs and makes cable glands, connectors and accessories for hazardous and non hazardous locations.

Stadium Packing Services, located at Swalwell, is a bespoke export packing service for hazardous and non hazardous products.

And Bishop Auckland based Stephenson Gobin, manufactures system activation devices used in fire safety.