Hospital unit benefits from staff donation

Joanne Lovat, from P&G, Evonne Swinbank with one-year-old Max, Jayne Straker, renal nurse specialist at the RVI, Heather Lambert, consultant paediatric nephrologist, Ian Swinbank, with three-year-old Ellie, and P&G�s Lori Douglass.
Joanne Lovat, from P&G, Evonne Swinbank with one-year-old Max, Jayne Straker, renal nurse specialist at the RVI, Heather Lambert, consultant paediatric nephrologist, Ian Swinbank, with three-year-old Ellie, and P&G�s Lori Douglass.

EMPLOYEES at Procter & Gamble have raised more than £10,000 to help sick children.

The staff at P&G’s Cobalt centre donated the money to the children’s kidney unit at the Royal Victoria Infirmary Hospital (RVI) in Newcastle.

The donation will go towards research and development of the M5.

It is a ground-breaking machine which allows haemodialysis – the cleaning of the blood through an artificial kidney of tiny babies with renal failure.

The unit was chosen by P&G employee Joanne Lovat as a result of a tragic loss suffered by two friends.

They lost their baby boy Tobi two years ago when he was born with two dysplastic kidneys.

Tobi’s parents, Evonne and Ian Swinbank, now have another son, one-year-old Max, who has one dysplastic kidney and is regularly monitored and receives treatment on the unit.

Joanne said: “P&G is committed to improving the lives of children as part of its global corporate cause ‘Live, Learn and Thrive’.

“I feel very proud that even in this tough economic climate my colleagues at P&G are still so kind-hearted, and year after year continue to think up such imaginative fundraising ideas.”

Consultant paediatric nephrologist at the unit, Dr Heather Lambert, said: “Significant donations from companies like P&G are pivotal to the development of the machine, which after more than ten years of research and development, is in the final testing stages before it can be made more widely available.”

Part of the £10,115 funding raised consisted of a £500 donation made by the FSS team at P&G’s Cobalt Shared Service Centre in North Tyneside in memory of their colleague, Chucks Emuchay, who sadly died in 2010 of kidney failure.

He had also been treated at the RVI.

The development of the M5 machine has been led by Dr Malcolm Coulthard, but involves a wide team of people.