DCSIMG

Unique way of bringing history to life

This card was sent to Felling on Tyne in 1905. In pencil is written Cramlington Co-operative Society. The number on the harness suggests a competition, which would be held on the village green adjacent to the Travellers Rest.

This card was sent to Felling on Tyne in 1905. In pencil is written Cramlington Co-operative Society. The number on the harness suggests a competition, which would be held on the village green adjacent to the Travellers Rest.

The history of Cramlington is being brought to life through images and messages from old picture postcards.

The book, Postcards from Cramlington, has pictures of local streets, schools, churches, the railway station, the Aerodrome and Cramlington Old Hall.

Author Brian Godfrey said: “The golden age of postcard sending and postcard collecting is generally recognised as being the ten or so years before the First World War.
“The popularity for postcards as a means of relatively fast and cheap communication was never equalled again outside of this period.

“Many cards can be found with the simple message ‘For your collection’.
“Albums of the time contain a diverse mixture of subjects as just about every subject that the mind can conjure was offered for sale by publishers.

“The postcard at that time became the Edwardian equivalent of our text message.
“The messages on the backs of postcards can be unique and worthy of mention, especially so with cards sent during the First World War.
“The message can give an insight into the lives of the senders and recipients, holidays, entertainment, relationships and serving soldiers to their loved ones telling of guard duty, drills, hopes and fears are the handwritten thoughts of those long gone.”

A number of photographs in the book feature soldiers stationed around Cramlington during the First World War.

Also included are several postcards that were published when Northumberland was bombed by a German Zeppelin on April 14, 1915.

The Zeppelin raid was only the second attack by a German airship during the First World War. Bombs were dropped on a field at West Sleekburn with further bombs landing at Bedlington, Cramlington and two casualties were caused by bombs at Wallsend.

Other sections of the book tell the story of Cramlington Aerodrome and the airship hanger that was once at Nelson Village, as well as an account of the day when Cramlington miners caused the derailment of the Flying Scotsman train during the General Strike in May 1926.

The book is on sale at Precious Moments at Manor Walks Shopping Centre in Cramlington, Robinson’s at Grainger Market in Newcastle, or from.summerhillbooks.co.uk

 

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