WATCH: Slideshow of pictures as county comes to a standstill to honour the fallen

Scores of people attended Remembrance services around Northumberland at the weekend to honour servicemen and women who have fallen in battle.

Services and parades took place across the county alongside a series of rededication ceremonies.

Tributes are paid at the Remembrance Sunday service in Blyth. Picture by John Tuttiett.

Tributes are paid at the Remembrance Sunday service in Blyth. Picture by John Tuttiett.

A service of remembrance took place in Blyth which saw hundreds of people turn out to pay their respects to service personnel.

A war memorial featuring the names of members of the Newsham and New Delaval Social Club who lost their lives in the First and Second World Wars was rededicated by Rev Richard Pringle of St Bedes Church, Newsham.

There are 18 names on the memorial, 15 from the First World War and three from the Second. All those listed were members or ‘shareholders’ of the Newsham and New Delaval Social Club.

The memorial stood in Newsham Library for decades until the building was demolished in 2008. The whereabouts of the memorial then became a mystery until it was tracked down to Woodhorn Museum by members of the Newsham and New Delaval Residents’ Association earlier this year.

Bedlington's Remembrance display of poppies in the shape of the Weeping Window. Photo by Crest Photography.

Bedlington's Remembrance display of poppies in the shape of the Weeping Window. Photo by Crest Photography.

The memorial’s plaque has been refurbished with funding from the county council’s members’ local improvement scheme, and a picket fence has been built by an apprentice employed by Homes for Northumberland.

In Bedlington, a Remembrance tribute was created consisting of more than 700 handmade poppies tumbling from the town’s community centre window to recreate the Weeping Window which was recently at Woodhorn.

All the poppies were made and the display assembled in less than a week by local people to represent the fallen.

In Ashington, six Canadians made an emotional 3,000 mile pilgrimage to Ashington to see the town honour the memory of their ancestor who won the Victoria Cross for outstanding bravery and courage in the dying days of the First World War.

Sgt Hugh Cairns who was born and brought up in the Northumberland town, had emigrated to Canada with his parents George Henry and Elizabeth, his eight brothers and sisters three years before hostilities began in 1914.

As part of the new war memorial garden in Ashington, which was opened in time for Sunday’s Remembrance Day parade and service, a plaque recalling Hugh’s exploits was also seen for the first time.

There to join in the service were 83-year-old Shirley Scott, the daughter of Harry Cairns and niece of Hugh; her son Sandy and his wife Rae-Ann; Nancy Boone (great niece of Hugh) and her husband Wayne; and Hugh’s great nephew Colin Coutts.

“We were all so proud and overjoyed to see the way Ashington has honoured Hugh,” added Mr Coutts.

The Memorial Garden project has been two years in the making led by Ashington Town Council with the support of the town’s branch of The Royal British Legion and the Western Front Association.