Scream franchise still has that buzz

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THE Scream franchise is one that I have watched from the very beginning, and is one that has seemingly never lost its original sparkle with poor sequels.

The films, all directed by the legendary Wes Craven, started out 11 years ago, and Scream4 still has the same buzz about it as the first film did all those years ago.

Scream4 makes no bones about trying to be cool and trendy, dropping lines about Facebook, Twitter, using iPhones left, right and centre, and above all, focusing on the fact that people now want live information as and when it happens.

But when this film starts out, it is cleverly showing a series of people dissecting the idea of the Stab films, until you aren’t sure where the film really starts any more.

On the fifteenth anniversary of the Woodsboro massacre by Billy Loomis and Stu Macher, high school students Jenny Randall (Aimee Teegarden) and Marnie Cooper (Brittany Robertson) are attacked and brutally killed by a new Ghostface.

The following day, Sidney Prescott (Neve Campbell) returns to promote her new book and becomes a suspect in the murders, with evidence in her rental car, forced by Dewey Riley (David Arquette) to stay in Woodsboro until the crime is solved.

While in town, she stays with her aunt Kate Roberts (Mary McDonnell) and cousin Jill (Emma Roberts).

Of course loads of grisly murders and plenty of jumps later, the masked killer is revealed, and I for one, was actually shocked.

This is a good horror film, where you know the basic outline of what to expect, and it’s enjoyable for that, without being overly gruesome as some can be.

It’s a good update on the original, which is hard to believe came out 11 years ago, but it brings the franchise right up to date, and it’s great to see the same characters being bought back to life in the form of Dewey (David Arquette), Gale Weathers (Courtney Cox) and of course Sidney.

A good film that, unlike Scream 2 and 3, has a plot that really makes sense, and could actually be believable.