More than 100 lorry operators caught using emissions cheat devices

More than 100 lorry operators caught using emissions cheat devices
More than 100 lorry operators caught using emissions cheat devices

More than 100 HGV operators have been caught by government inspectors using “cheat devices” to alter their vehicles’ emission readings.

In August 2017, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) started to include checks for emissions cheat devices in roadside checks at five locations across Great Britain.

By the end of November, examiners had searched 3,735 lorries and found 293 lorries with a cheat device fitted.

The devices, which take various forms, alter a vehicle’s emissions reading and potentially mean it emits far higher levels of pollution than it should. The advantage to operators is that the devices can cut the cost of running the vehicle.

If they are caught and do not fix the cheat within 10 day, drivers and operators can face a fine of £300 and having the vehicle taken off the road. Repeat offenders can see their vehicle seized on the spot.

Gareth Llewellyn, DVSA chief executive, said: “DVSA’s priority is to protect [the public] from unsafe drivers and vehicles.

“We are committed to taking dangerous lorries off Britain’s roads. Stopping emissions fraud is a vital part of that.

Anyone who flouts the law is putting the quality of our air and the health of vulnerable people, at risk. We won’t hesitate to take action against these drivers, operators and vehicles.”

The roadside checks found that 7.8 per cent of all lorries checked were fitted with some sort of emissions cheat. That rose to 8.5 per cent of vehicles registered in Great Britain and 20.4 per cent of Northern Irish-registered vehicles.

Among the techniques uncovered during the inspections were using devices designed to stop emissions control systems from working; removing the diesel particulate filter; using cheap, fake emission reduction devices or diesel exhaust fluid ;using illegal engine modifications which result in excessive emissions; removing or bypassing the exhaust gas recirculation valve.

Following the roadside checks, DVSA examiners are inspecting more than 100 operators’ entire fleets for cheat devices. Some of the companies being inspected operate up to 80 vehicles.

The DVSA has also said that it will extend the checks to more inspections sites around the country this year.

No-deal Brexit: British expats in EU may have to retake driving tests if UK leaves without deal

British people living in Europe may be forced to sit a new driving test in the wake of a no-deal Brexit, according to Government advice.On

Car insurance costs on the rise and worse is to come

The cost of car insurance has risen across the UK, with warnings that the accelerating price rises could get even worse.The average premium

Pass masters - the cars most likely to make it through the MOT first time

New data from the Government has revealed the cars most and least likely to pass the MOT test as well as where, and when, most first-time passes

Toyota Supra - legendary sports car returns at Detroit motor show

Toyota has revealed its much-anticipated next-generation Supra at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit.The new model revives