Terminal illness is no barrier to Peter

Cancer sufferer Peter Almond raises money for Macmillan with a giant coffee morning at the Keel Row pub at Seaton Delaval and he is seen with staff member Liane Patterson (left) and Keel Row Licensee Sharon Heron.'REF 2207133098
Cancer sufferer Peter Almond raises money for Macmillan with a giant coffee morning at the Keel Row pub at Seaton Delaval and he is seen with staff member Liane Patterson (left) and Keel Row Licensee Sharon Heron.'REF 2207133098

‘Nature is just taking its course.’ That is how philosophical Peter Almond describes his life while living with terminal cancer.

The 62-year-old was diagnosed with bowel and liver cancer eight years ago, but despite getting the all clear from doctors, the disease returned and not only spread to his liver but also to his lungs.

He has since been told the illness is terminal.

But instead of wallowing in self pity, he is looking at the positives, and exploring ways to give something back to the people who have helped him.

And this week Peter, who has retired from his job working with computers, has launched the World’s Biggest Coffee Morning for Macmillan Cancer which will take place in September, and he will be hosting a second coffee morning at the Keel Row Pub in Seaton Delaval.

He said: “For years now I have received all kinds of care and help from the system, and this is my way of giving something back.

“Last year we thought it would be a little gathering, but the whole pub was packed, everybody in the place was on a high and we raised £3,800.

“This year we will do exactly the same.”

Peter is a regular at the Keel Row, travelling the short journey from his home village of Seaton Delaval to the pub every day for a pint.

His body has become immune to years of chemotherapy that there is nothing more that can be done, but he has started the process of clinical trials at the Bobby Robson Cancer Trials Research Centre in Newcastle.

“I don’t think it will help me,” he added, “but it might help other people in the future, that’s what it is about.”

The father of four has been referred twice to Macmillan and is keen to support the work they do.

Macmillan’s fundraising manager Kelly Knighting-Wykes said: “We want to make sure no one has to face cancer alone, but we can’t do it without the amazing people who fundraise for us.

“Last year we raised a record-breaking amount of money form the World’s Biggest Coffee Morning and we really hope we can repeat that again this year.

“We’re asking people to once again invite their friends, relatives or workmates to come for coffee and help support Macmillan.”

The official World’s Biggest Coffee Morning day is on September 27 but events can be held any time.