Record turn-out at Cambois beach clean

The sorting station for the beach clean at Cambois.

A beach clean in Cambois had a record attendance of volunteers who felt the need to do their bit for the marine environment.

Awareness of the effects of plastic pollution has grown lately, thanks to TV programmes like Blue Planet II.

Volunteers cleaning Cambois beach.

Shocking scenes of whales swallowing plastic bags has made people stop and think about their throw-away lifestyles and take ownership of their local environments.

Nearly 60 volunteers descended on Cambois beach on February 18, as part of a clean-up organised by The Fifth Point Diving Centre.

In just over an hour, the army of eco warriors removed a staggering 250 kilograms of rubbish from the beach, sea defences and dune area.

The majority of waste collected consisted of plastic which would have otherwise found its way into the sea.

The haul of litter and rubbish picked up at Cambois beach.

Data suggests that more than eight million tonnes of plastic enters the world’s oceans every year and that by 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in the water.

The Fifth Point has conducted monthly beach cleans on the North East coast since 2016.

In total, its volunteers have cleaned more than 1.2 tonnes of rubbish from the beaches.

Owners Nic Emery and James Learwood are passionate about protecting the oceans as they spend a great deal of time diving up and down the Northumberland coastline.

Nic, revealing more about their constant battle, said: “We’re committed to keeping our sea trash-free.

“The North Sea is our office and our playground so every dive we do is a Dive Against Debris – we always find something to remove and lost fishing gear is a huge problem.

“By holding beach and river clean-ups, we’re helping to nip the problem in the bud, stopping any litter reaching the ocean where it can injure or kill our area’s thriving wildlife.”

Their next clean-up event is on Saturday, from 10.30am to 3pm when volunteers will tackle the litter problem on the banks of the River Blyth next to the dive centre as part of the Great British Spring Clean.

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